Thursday, May 5, 2011

i feel my time

caspar david friedrich mountain landscape with rainbow (detail)


soft grey fingers
cross the far hills
and glide across the gardens

i know
that soon they will hold
my own tired hands

.

as they
flow under the darkened house
a song tumbles from my mouth

wordless

self-conscious
it inches like a vine
attaching
single notes
to the inside of the window

.

i write by
the glow of the night-rainbow's arc
whose feeble light
settles like dust
on the leafy curtain
of my creation

24 comments:

Annie said...

I write by the glow of the night-rainbow's arc.......such a gorgeous line.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Nice, gentle words Steven - like a nice gentle night settling in.

Ruth said...

I feel tenderness for the Song in this poem. It is truly a wonder to be part and witness of its creation and expression.

Valerianna said...

Each verse holds gems...

Jinksy said...

I believe I caught your words before I read them... My email will explain! LOL

Lilith said...

I don't know why but this makes me feel so sad.

Pearl said...

What a lovely, quiet progression of thought.

Pearl

Pauline said...

sometimes you leave me wordless...

Jo said...

Sometimes, I look at my hands and see my mother's.

Beautiful verse, Steven. Just keep singing.

alaine@éclectique said...

Oh, too sad. I'm wordless too, do hope you're OK.

steven said...

annie - when i saw the painting i wondered at night rainbows. they exist. we can't see them. but surely they glow. surely. steven

steven said...

weaver - there's a softness about this piece, a gentleness that has as much to do with melancholy as it has to do with waiting for energy to flow again. steven

steven said...

ruth the wordless song is a thing of wonder. it finds its source beyond the mouth, beyond the lung, beyond air. it is entirely placed in the moment unfolding. steven

steven said...

valerianna - in the heaven of indra there is a necklace made of pearls each a mirror of the pearl beside it. into infinitude. steven

steven said...

thankyou for the image jinksy. it's remarkable. steven

steven said...

lilith it openly welcomes death - the death of . . . well something . . . and we associate sorrow with death. in this instance the present moment is welcoming an event from the future which of necessity pushes the "present" into the past and so it passes through a sort of leaving - a death. perhaps that is where your sorrow is placed. steven

steven said...

hello pearl, despite the sense of foreboding and sorrow there is goodness about this expression of my understanding of the passing and leaving of a state of being. steven

steven said...

pauline - silence is a state that i welcome when its terms are linked with the welcoming of the future. steven

steven said...

jo - yesterday i had a post prepared that featured a photograph of my father's hand. he sent it to me because he knew i would unpack the associations with that hand. so yesterday i did. everything. it doesn't look like my hand although my hands are aging (i'm fifty four this august!) and i was ready to push the publish button and i felt such compassion for him and for his life which he brought to a fruitful and loving conclusion in so many ways that i deleted the entire piece. your comment is so resonant and i am not astonished. there's no need. steven

steven said...

alaine - i am almost entirely alright. thanks for your care. read through the comments and you'll see the place this post comes from and where it is pointing. steven

OceanoAzul.Sonhos said...

The words transmit feelings, the poetry is very close to the soul of man. Wonderful.
oa.s

steven said...

oa.s, thankyou for this very generous and insightful comment. steven

Terresa said...

Steven, as always, a thoughtful flow here. I can picture the darkened house, the single notes, the feeble light settling like dust...

In reading this poem, there is a welcoming into it, a stepping into that makes me want to linger.

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