Thursday, April 14, 2011

ocean's edge (ii)

after the earthquake that devastated haiti, the northern shoreline of cuba and especially the chain of islands i was staying on was altered such that the wave action was somewhat intensified. the thinking is that the many years of accumulation of sand along the coast shifted and was carried back out to sea. the big cycles of nature (of which this is surely one) would be incredible to see if we were able to speed up the tape of time and view the ebb and flow of the various processes that we are privileged to witness for such a relatively short span of time.

having said that, the beaches we walked on were comprised of very fine white sand - not talcum powder fine but finer than salt. in some places about two kilometres down the beach, the wave action was more intense than others, resulting in outcroppings of wave-worn rock, which if you remember my trip to prince edward island last summer, is a source of fascination for me.



i spent some time sitting here with the waves crashing around me.
a small blissful, beautiful space


i explored the rocks each time the waves pulled away - my time was understandably brief


the very little cycles of nature (of which this is surely one) would be incredible to see if we were able to speed up the tape of time and view the ebb and flow of the various processes that we are privileged to witness for such a relatively short span of time.
the scouring of little grains of sand and the insistant, purposeful swirling of water has created these little pockets and portals compelling me to move closer to see what treasures are stored inside or beyond.

19 comments:

Terresa said...

The ebb and flow of waves, of life, of time...all a washing of days.

I enjoyed your picture-scape here and word painting, thanks for it, Steven!

Radcliffe said...

Having visited both the Dominican Republic and Haiti - I have to agree the coastline is beautiful - nature in all her constant finery. Wish I was there now.

Ruth said...

The big and the small. Yes. I was thinking yesterday about the miracles of the world, how some are slow motion, but they are miracles nonetheless.

Jinksy said...

A sea shore to marvel at, indeed...

steven said...

terresa, the ebb and flow washed the legacy of many days away fromt he forefront of my experiencing. a blessing, as gifts often are. steven

steven said...

radcliffe - i do as well!!! steven

steven said...

ruth - the unfolding miracles are hard to spot and when in process, almost impossible to appreciate for their unfolding. but like flowers, children, the world as a whole, astonishing miracles nevertheless. steven

steven said...

jinksy - i a ppreciate seashores no matter where they are. caribbean seashores might rank very high up if i were to start ranking them. steven

aguja said...

A beautiful and thought provoking post, Steven ... and it took me to Irelaned, where the sea always draws and fascinates and brings past travellers to mind ... and ways of life.
As you say ... if we could wind back and then fast forward from then to now, watching the whole pattern of change in those coves and crevices...
Your photographs are wonderful.

steven said...

aguja thankyou. i haven't been to ireland. some of my genetic heritage has its home there but i've felt no call to return although some of the southern coast appeals to me. it's a silly wish - to be able to see nature speeded up or really slowed down - but i am able to do it with my own life so easily and see the patterns that have led me to this moment and i wish the same was possible for everything else. steven

OceanoAzul.Sonhos said...

steven, thanks, one more time, for sharing with us your experience. These photos are wonderful and have an immense power, the power of the ocean.
oa.s

Reya Mellicker said...

I love that picture of you gazing out at the acqua sea.

Who in the world could ever doubt that the earth is a living being, shifting, changing, erupting, shaking. She is alive!

Valerianna said...

I love the in-out, in-out rhythm on the coast: where the Earth's breathing is palpable.

Linda Sue said...

There will be drama, and intensity, living by the sea. The scale of the largeness of changes maintains the WOW factor consistently. The aqua and blue and white contrasts so brilliantly with your bright pimento shirt, wonderful shot! So warm and fresh and so welcomed on this grey puget sounder day.

Jo said...

Your amazing words and photographs bring to mind the poem, "Exiled" by Edna St. Vincent Millay,

"...Wanting the sticky, salty sweetness
Of the strong wind and shattered spray;
Wanting the loud sound and the soft sound
Of the big surf that breaks all day..."

Her sea was off the coast of Maine, but the feeling of being so intensely drawn to the ocean is the same...beautiful.

Pauline said...

such beautiful photos - and beautiful memories. Thanks for sharing :)

R. Burnett Baker said...

Steven, in keeping with your theme, did you catch the time lapse video of a flight from SF to Paris? It's about two min. long and caught the Northern Lights. Here's a link...the best I could find. Hope you can watch it before it's removed....

http://www.boingboing.net/2011/04/13/time-lapse-of-san-fr.html

Rick

Liza Ursu said...

"the insistant, purposeful swirling of water"
gosh I just love that.
That last sentence, and that ocean blue, WOWeeeee!
Thanks for this post Steven

(Diane) Bibliophile By the Sea said...

Just came across your blog today and thought you photography was awesome. Nice job.